More stories

  • in

    Artist Sam Durant’s Eerie Modernist Drone Will Hover Over New York as the Next High Line Plinth Commission

    An ominous but easily missable new sculpture will appear 25 feet over the High Line next month. Sam Durant’s fiberglass kinetic sculpture of a Predator drone will be more or less visible depending on the wind, time of day, and light conditions. Sometimes it will blend into the clouds altogether.
    The artist’s stripped-down drone looks like a sleekly abstract Modernist sculpture, and does not include the remote-controlled military aircraft’s cameras, weapons, or landing gear. But with a 48-foot wingspan, it is the same size as the real deal.
    “For Sam, the goal is to make visible in America the drone warfare that this country carries out against countries very far away,” Cecilia Alemani, director and chief curator of High Line Art, told the New York Times.
    The U.S. military began using Predator drones in 1995. It has used them to conduct reconnaissance and airstrikes in Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Pakistan, Syria, Somalia, Yemen, and other countries in the decades since.
    Sam Durant, Untitled (drone), rendering. Photo courtesy of High Line Art.
    “We can pretty much say that there’s never been a just war,” Durant said in a video produced by High Line Art. “Maybe people are not aware of the drones and just how ubiquitous they are in other parts of the world.” The sculpture, which rotates like a weathervane, will be on view for 18 months,
    “Untitled (drone) is meant to animate the question about the use of drones, surveillance, and targeted killings in places far and near, and whether as a society we agree with and want to continue these practices,” Durant said in a statement.

    [embedded content]

    Durant’s work is the second commission for the High Line Plinth, a dedicated space for monumental contemporary art that was first announced in 2017 and inspired by the “Fourth Plinth” in London’s Trafalgar Square. Durant’s proposal was one of 12 finalists unveiled that year, but his selection remained under wraps until now.
    The plinth’s inaugural work, Brick House by Simone Leigh, has been on view since 2019, when the last section of the old train tracks that make up the High Line first opened. (Governor Andrew Cuomo recently announced a two-pronged expansion of the elevated park.)
    Leigh has since been tapped to represent the U.S. at the Venice Biennale in 2022, for which Alemani is director of the international exhibition.
    Simone Leigh, Brick House at the Spur, the last section of the original structure of the High Line to be converted into public space in New York. Photo by Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images.
    Last summer, the High Line offered the public a chance to weigh in on 80 proposals for the third and fourth plinth commissions, set to appear in 2022 and 2024. The 12 artists still in the running include Iván Argote, Nick Cave, and Teresita Fernández.
    Untitled (drone) is Durant’s first major public sculpture since a controversy erupted after Minneapolis’s Walker Art Center acquired his piece Scaffold (2012) in 2017. The work, which had been exhibited without issue at Documenta in Germany, served as a critique of capital punishment in the U.S. The sculpture was a composite of the gallows used in six high-profile executions, including the largest in the nation’s history, of 38 Dakota men, in Mankato, Minnesota.
    Sam Durant, Scaffold. Courtesy of Sarah Cascone.
    The tribe, which was not consulted ahead of the work’s acquisition, objected to the display and Durant ultimately handed the sculpture over to the tribe to be buried.
    “Having my work seen by the Dakota community, whose struggle with historical injustice it was meant to support, as an attack on them was deeply painful,” Durant told the Times. “They wanted to perform a ritual healing process and that was, in my eyes, the most appropriate way to continue with the work.
    Follow Artnet News on Facebook: Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward. More

  • in

    The Late Artist Matthew Wong Made an Ink Drawing Every Morning. For the First Time, Two Dozen Will Go on View in New York

    Next month, two dozen never-before-exhibited ink drawings by the late painter Matthew Wong will debut at Cheim & Read in New York. 
    The graphic, black-and-white drawings represent just a small sampling of such works the artist left behind when he died by suicide in 2019 at the age of 35.
    ARTnews, the first outlet to report the upcoming show, points out that, for years, Wong would make an ink illustration every morning after waking up. “The only thing that takes place at the same time every day is when I get out of bed, I have to do an ink drawing before doing anything else, such as brushing my teeth or eating,” the artist said in an early interview with the blog Studio Critical.
    Matthew Wong, Winter Wind (2016). ©2021 Matthew Wong Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Alex Yudzon / Cheim & Read, New York.
    “Footprints in the Wind, Ink Drawings 2013–2017,” as the show is called, comes via a collaboration between the gallery and the newly created Matthew Wong Foundation, run by Wong’s parents. (The foundation, which is still in its early stages, will determine what to do with the 1,000 works Wong left behind.)
    It’s set to open May 5 at Cheim & Read’s old building in Chelsea—the first time the dealers John Cheim and Howard Read have used the space for a public exhibition since decamping to the Upper East Side in 2018. A representative from the gallery declined to share the price range of the works, but did mention that “several of them have been earmarked for museum acquisitions only.”
    You can expect collectors to make the trip. The market for Wong’s work has been rapacious in the wake of his death: Since June of 2020, 11 of the artists’ paintings have fetched over $1 million at auction, with each exceeding their pre-sale estimate by at least 100 percent, according to Artnet’s Price Database.  
    Matthew Wong, The Watcher (2017). ©2021 Matthew Wong Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Alex Yudzon / Cheim & Read, New York.
    The influence of Chinese landscape painting looms large in Wong’s ink-on-rice-paper illustrations, but a darkness—literal and metaphoric—undercuts the sense of sublimity you’d expect from such work. Mysterious figures and looming specters appear throughout.
    In a statement to Artnet News, Cheim, one of the artist’s earliest supporters in the New York art world, compared his drawings to “Kusama, Van Gogh, Munch, and the early ink drawings of Louise Bourgeois. It is as if you can feel the particles in the air. The space between the interior and the exterior dissolves—a kind of psychological pantheism presents itself.”
    Sometime in 2014, the dealer met Wong over Facebook, a platform on which the artist often engaged in public discussions about art. The next year, Wong and his mother Monita visited Cheim in New York with a tube of large black ink drawings in tow. “Matthew was a striking presence—tall, handsome, a shock of black hair and large black eyeglasses, all carefully considered,” the dealer recalled. 
    “I found the ink drawings to be singular, intense,” Cheim added. He reportedly purchased one at the time and maintained a close relationship with the artist thereafter.
    Follow Artnet News on Facebook: Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward. More

  • in

    Saudi Arabia Refused to Lend the ‘Salvator Mundi’ to the Louvre Because It Wouldn’t Be Shown Next to the ‘Mona Lisa,’ a Report Says

    The plot thickens around the Salvator Mundi, the world’s most expensive painting, and the mystery of why the Louvre didn’t include it in its blockbuster 2019 Leonardo da Vinci exhibition.
    A new documentary film, The Savior for Sale, which premieres tomorrow night on French television, claims that according to anonymous French officials, the museum refused to acquiesce to Saudi Arabian demands that the work be displayed as an autograph Leonardo after scientific testing determined that the artist merely contributed to the painting.
    But a New York Times story now contradicts that claim. According to a Louvre report obtained by the Times, the museum didn’t doubt the work’s authenticity. The real issue is that Saudi officials demanded it be shown next to the Mona Lisa, which curators refused to allow.
    “In general, the museum world, and the specialist art historians and curators in it, never really had any doubts about the painting’s authenticity,” dealer Robert Simon, who played a key role in the rediscovery of the work after it turned up at an estate sale in 2005, told Artnet News in an email.
    Leonardo da Vinci, Salvator Mundi (ca. 1500). Courtesy of Christie’s Images Ltd.
    “There have been a couple of outliers, of course, but most scholarly discussion has had to do with the date, patron, iconography, and workshop participation, if any,” he added.
    The newly leaked report—from a planned Salvator Mundi book pulled from the Louvre’s gift shops when plans to exhibit the work fell through—would have confirmed the painting as an authentic Leonardo. The Center for Research and Restoration of the Museums of France is said to have made that determination on the strength of a weeks-long forensic examination using fluorescent X-rays, infrared scans, and high-resolution microscopes in 2018.
    State of Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi before restoration. Image courtesy Christie’s.
    “The results of the historical and scientific study presented in this publication allow us to confirm the attribution of the work to Leonardo da Vinci,” Jean-Luc Martinez, the Louvre’s president, wrote in the introduction.
    The cancelled publication also identified the Saudi Culture Ministry as the painting’s owner. The Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, Mohammed bin Salman, is widely understood to have purchased the work at Christie’s New York for a record-setting $450 million on 2017.
    The Louvre pulled its book on Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi. Photo courtesy of the Louvre.
    But a power struggle developed because the Louvre didn’t think it was a good idea to exhibit the painting next to the Mona Lisa. The Louve’s most famous painting was to remain on view apart from the rest of the Leonardo exhibition, in order to accommodate its regular crowds. What’s more, adding another major work to the gallery would have presented too big of a security challenge.
    The Saudis ultimately withheld the painting, and the Louvre withheld its evaluation, which caused a storm of doubt about the work.
    (A planned appearance at the Louvre Abu Dhabi was also cancelled, and the painting—not seen publicly since its sale—has been rumored to be aboard the prince’s yacht, the Serene.)
    Antoine Vitkine’s The Savior for Sale will debut on French television on April 13. Image ©Zadig productions/FTV.
    But Antoine Vitkine, the director of the new film, stands by his version of events, suggesting to La Tribune del’ Art that the book was produced as a contingency plan in case the government agreed to bow to Saudi demands that the painting be shown as authentic.
    The museum has declined to comment on the issue.
    “It is, of course, unfortunate that the painting was pulled from the Louvre exhibition, but that does not reflect poorly on the painting,” Simon said. “In fact, it probably just adds to the painting’s celebrity and allure, and will only generate more interest in it when it is eventually shown, wherever and whenever that might be.”
    Follow Artnet News on Facebook: Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward. More

  • in

    For Its Major Post-Pandemic Triennial, the New Museum Has Invited 40 Rising Artists to Explore the Theme of Persistence

    The 2021 New Museum triennial—the fifth iteration of its signature exhibition of emerging artists—has been in the works since long before the pandemic. But its overarching theme, of tenacity in the face of hardship, will likely feel more relevant than ever when the show opens this fall, well over a year into the pandemic.
    The museum announced today that the exhibition, co-organized by Margot Norton, a curator at the New Museum, and Jamillah James, senior curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, is titled “Soft Water Hard Stone.” The name comes from a Brazilian proverb: Água mole em pedra dura, tanto bate até que fura (“Soft water on hard stone hits until it bores a hole”).
    For the curators, it’s a metaphor for persistence: Even the most inexorable of materials change with time and energy. 
    The 40 artists included in the show—a group that represents five continents and nearly all media—the proverb can, occasionally, be read more literally. The transfiguration of discordant materials and ideas will constitute a prominent theme in the exhibition, as will the use of outmoded models and artistic traditions.
    “Their works exalt states of transformation, calling attention to the malleability of structures, porous and unstable surfaces, and the fluid and adaptable potential of both technological and organic media,” a statement on the triennial reads. 
    Ambera Wellmann, UnTurning (2019). Courtesy of the artist and KTZ gallery, Berlin.
    Though all of the artists were born after 1975, the curators say they didn’t look to birth dates for their definition of “emerging artists.”
    “We decided that, instead of age, our parameter would be based on exposure,” James tells Artnet News, “so that artists we invited that had not yet had a major solo exhibition in a U.S. museum.” 
    Norton and James began research for the Triennial in the summer 2018, logging nearly two year’s worth of travel and in-person studio visits before the pandemic necessitated some improvisation. “When we scheduled our travel, we were interested in visiting locations where it made a difference to be there physically, and in areas where artists are often underrepresented in international exhibitions,” James says, pointing to places such as North Africa, South Asia, and Eastern Europe.
    Since then, the curators have “become quite accustomed to the Zoom studio visit, to say the least.” Norton says. “While there is a huge disadvantage to not seeing work in person, we actually found it to be quite efficient to continue our research remotely, particularly as we honed in on the show’s theme, and for the artists whose works we have had the opportunity to see in person prior.” 
    Brandon Ndife, Modern Dilemma (2020). Courtesy of the artist and Bureau, New York.
    “Soft Water Hard Stone,” is set to run from October 27, 2021 to January 23, 2022 at the New Museum. See the full list of participating artists below.

    Haig Aivazian (b. 1980 Beirut, Lebanon; lives and works in Beirut, Lebanon)
    Evgeny Antufiev (b. 1986 Kyzyl, Russia; lives and works in Moscow, Russia)
    Alex Ayed (b. 1989 Strasbourg, France; lives and works in Brussels, Belgium, and Tunis, Tunisia)
    Nadia Belerique (b. 1982 Mississauga, Ontario, Canada; lives and works in Toronto, Canada)
    Hera Büyüktaşcıyan (b. 1984 Istanbul, Turkey; lives and works in Istanbul, Turkey) 
    Tomás Díaz Cedeño (b. 1983 Mexico City, Mexico; lives and works in Mexico City, Mexico) 
    Gabriel Chaile (b. 1985 San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina; lives and works in Lisbon, Portugal)
    Gaëlle Choisne (b. 1985 Cherbourg, France; lives and works in Paris, France)
    Krista Clark (b. 1975 Burlington, VT, United States; lives and works in Atlanta, GA, United States) 
    Kate Cooper (b. 1984, Liverpool, United Kingdom; lives and works in Amsterdam, the Netherlands) 
    Cynthia Daignault (b. 1978 Baltimore, MD, United States; lives and works in Baltimore, MD, United States) 
    Jes Fan (b. 1990 Toronto, Canada; lives and works in New York, NY, United States and Hong Kong)
    Goutam Ghosh (b. 1979 Nabadwip, India; lives and works in Kolkata, India) 
    Harry Gould Harvey IV (b. 1991 Fall River, MA, United States; lives and works in Fall River, MA, United States) 
    Clara Ianni (b. 1987 São Paolo, Brazil; lives and works in São Paolo, Brazil)
    Kahlil Robert Irving (b. 1992 San Diego, CA, United States; lives and works in St. Louis, MO, United States) 
    Arturo Kameya (b. 1984 Lima, Peru; lives and works in Amsterdam, the Netherlands) 
    Laurie Kang (b. 1985 Toronto, Canada; lives and works in Toronto, Canada)  
    Bronwyn Katz (b. 1993 Kimberly, South Africa; lives and works in Cape Town, South Africa) 
    Ann Greene Kelly (b. 1988 New York, NY, United States; lives and works in Los Angeles, CA, United States)
    Kang Seung Lee (b. 1978 Seoul, South Korea; lives and works in Los Angeles, CA, United States) 
    Amy Lien and Enzo Camacho (b. 1987 Dallas, TX, United States; lives and works in New York, NY, United States) and (b. 1985 Manila, Philippines; lives and works in Berlin, Germany) 
    Tanya Lukin Linklater (Alutiiq) (b. 1976 Kodiak, AK, United States; lives and works in North Bay, Ontario, Canada)
    Angelika Loderer (b. 1984 Feldbach, Austria; lives and works in Vienna, Austria)
    Sandra Mujinga (b. 1989 Goma, Democratic Republic of the Congo; lives and works in Oslo, Norway and Berlin, Germany)
    Gabriela Mureb (b. 1985 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; lives and works in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
    Brandon Ndife (b. 1991 Hammond, IN, United States; lives and works in Brooklyn, NY, United States)
    Erin Jane Nelson (b. 1989 Neenah, WI, United States; lives and works in Atlanta, GA, United States) 
    Jeneen Frei Njootli (Vuntut Gwitchin) (b. 1988 Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada; lives and works in Vancouver, Canada)
    Ima-Abasi Okon (b. 1981 London, United Kingdom; lives and works in London, United Kingdom and Amsterdam, the Netherlands)
    Christina Pataialii (b. 1988 Auckland, New Zealand; lives and works in Wellington, New Zealand)
    Thao Nguyen Phan (b. 1987 Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; lives and works in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam)
    Nickola Pottinger (b. 1986 Kingston, Jamaica; lives and works in New York, NY, United States)
    Rose Salane (b. 1992 New York, NY, United States; lives and works in New York, NY, United States)
    Blair Saxon-Hill (b. 1979 Eugene, OR, United States; lives and works in Portland, OR, United States)
    Samara Scott (b. 1984 London, United Kingdom; lives and works in London, United Kingdom)
    Amalie Smith (b. 1985 Copenhagen, Denmark; lives and works in Copenhagen, Denmark)
    Iris Touliatou (b. 1981 Athens, Greece; lives and works in Athens, Greece) 
    Ambera Wellmann (b. 1982 Lunenberg, Nova Scotia, Canada; lives and works in New York, NY, United States)
    Yu Ji (b. 1985 Shanghai, China; lives and works in Shanghai, China)

    Follow Artnet News on Facebook: Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward. More

  • in

    Painter Alice Neel’s Career Survey at the Met Suggests What Empathy Can Look Like in an Age of Difference—See Images Here

    “Alice Neel: People Come First”at the Metropolitan Museum of Artthrough August 1

    What the museum says: “‘Alice Neel: People Come First’ is the first museum retrospective in New York of American artist Alice Neel (1900–1984) in 20 years. This ambitious survey positions Neel as one of the century’s most radical painters, a champion of social justice whose longstanding commitment to humanist principles inspired her life as well as her art, as demonstrated in the approximately one hundred paintings, drawings, and watercolors that will appear in the Met’s survey.
    Images of activists demonstrating against fascism and racism appear alongside paintings of impoverished victims of the Great Depression, as well as portraits of Neel’s neighbors in Spanish Harlem, leaders from a wide range of political organizations, queer artists and performers, and members of New York’s global diaspora. The exhibition also highlights Neel’s erotic watercolors and pastels from the 1930s, her depictions of mothers, and her paintings of nude figures (some of them visibly pregnant), all of whose candor and irreverence are without precedent in the history of Western art.”
    Why it’s worth a look: For a long time, art historians weren’t quite sure what to do with Alice Neel. She painted representational pictures of everyday people in an era when abstraction was king and figuration was widely considered finished. She worked in New York, where finding space in an art world dominated by the outsize influence of the Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning was difficult. And she was a woman, which made it that much harder to find recognition.
    But the past few years have seen a renewed surge of interest in her work. A sterling exhibition at David Zwirner in New York curated by writer Hilton Als in 2017 brought Neel to fresh audiences, and that show’s catalogue extended the exhibition’s reach beyond its closing date. Now, with this full career survey at the Met, she finally finds a permanent place in the Western canon as a forerunner to the representational painters who dominate today’s headlines.
    Neel spent many of her years in New York, and as the Met puts it, the city was “her most faithful subject.” She had a deep sense for its characters, their idiosyncrasies and mannerisms, and a reverence for difference, plurality, and individuality. Not unlike contemporary artists like Amy Sherald or Salman Toor, she was able to connect with her sitters’ identities and to draw out their complexities while still maintaining a relatively simple yet vibrant painterly mark.
    “For me, people come first,” Neel said in 1950. “I have tried to assert the dignity and eternal importance of the human being.” That’s the best lesson anyone can draw from the show—especially these days, when empathy is at once more necessary and rarer than ever.
    What it looks like:
    Alice Neel, Mercedes Arroyo (1952). © The Estate of Alice Neel.
    Alice Neel, Linda Nochlin and Daisy (1973). © The Estate of Alice Neel.
    Alice Neel, James Farmer (1964). © The Estate of Alice Neel.
    Alice Neel, Margaret Evans Pregnant (1978). © The Estate of Alice Neel.
    Alice Neel, Jackie Curtis and Ritta Redd (1970). © The Estate of Alice Neel.
    Alice Neel, Andy Warhol (1970). © The Estate of Alice Neel.
    Follow Artnet News on Facebook: Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward. More

  • in

    Hauser & Wirth Will Exhibit Philip Guston’s Klan Paintings a Year After The Series Sparked a Fiery Debate About Censorship

    Last year, a firestorm of controversy ignited when four leading international museums postponed a long-awaited Philip Guston retrospective over concerns that the artist’s paintings of hooded Klansmen needed additional contextualization in light of the heightened racial tensions following the summer’s Black Lives Matter protests.
    Now, New York’s Hauser & Wirth gallery, which represents the artist’s estate, has taken it upon itself to spotlight those challenging works in “Philip Guston, 1969–1979,” a show dedicated to the final decade of his career.
    “The timing for ‘Philip Guston: 1969–1979’ is urgent because of the art’s relevance to our cultural context today,” Marc Payot, the gallery’s president, told Artnet News in an email.
    “The racial reckoning and widespread calls for social justice that have rightly brought so many Americans into the streets over the past couple years—particularly since the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and too many others—echo the context in which Guston made these late works.”
    The gallery says the show was not organized in response to the controversial postponement.
    When it opens in September, the exhibition will focus on the painter’s late-in-life embrace of figuration after he helped pioneer Abstract Expressionism as a first generation painter of the New York School.
    Film still of Philip Guston in his Woodstock studio, summer 1971. From footage by Michael Blackwood Productions. ©The Estate of Philip Guston, courtesy the Estate and Hauser & Wirth.
    Critics initially lambasted Guston’s change of direction, which involved an unlikely combination of deliberately cartoon-like figures and the dark subject matter of systemic racism. But the works spoke to the insidious yet banal way that evil pervades US society. In these intimate, confessional paintings, both the artist and the viewer become complicit in a long history of racial injustice.
    “In his last decade, Guston achieved a visual language to express his lifelong outrage over inhumanity, bigotry, cruelty, and injustice everywhere,” Payot said.
    Originally, Guston’s museum retrospective was set to open at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., on June 7, 2020. The show was pushed back for a year due to the pandemic, before organizers announced that it would open in 2024 to give curators time to reassess the presentation.
    Following a widespread backlash and cries of censorship, the exhibition’s four organizing institutions opted for a 2022 opening date.
    Philip Guston, Back View II (1978). ©The Estate of Philip Guston, courtesy the Estate and Hauser & Wirth, private collection.
    “Yes, these are challenging works with painful imagery that calls to mind deep traumas,” Payot said. “But at the gallery, the paintings will speak for the themselves. Guston’s take on the human condition and his voice for social justice are by now manifest.”
    The Hauser & Wirth exhibition is set to include works that have never been exhibited before, with loans from museums and private collections. The show “will be complemented by robust public programs and critical writings that give significant context to the work and bring the artist’s ideas and images into the center of contemporary discourse,” Payot added.
    The gallery has represented the Guston estate since 2015, and has presented a series of shows covering different periods in the artist’s career, including his late abstract work and satirical Richard Nixon drawings.
    “We devoted one exhibition called ‘Resilience’ to a single year in Guston’s career—1971—when he moved to Europe in the wake of critical excoriation of his new figurative paintings at the now infamous Marlborough Gallery exhibition in New York in 1970,” Payot said. “We’ve always planned to organize a show focused on the paintings that made his Marlborough exhibition such a scandal, yet propelled Guston toward the most powerful decade of his career.”
    “Philip Guston, 1969–1979” will be on view at Hauser & Wirth, 542 West 22nd Street, New York, September 9–October 30, 2021.
    Follow Artnet News on Facebook: Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward. More

  • in

    This Dollhouse-Sized Museum Exhibition Will Show Tiny Works by Damien Hirst, Rachel Whiteread, and Other Artists—See Images Here

    In what may be the tiniest museum show ever, England’s Pallant Gallery will showcase work this summer by more than 30 of Britain’s most famous artists—and it will all be no bigger than the length of a No. 2 pencil.
    The show, titled “Masterpieces in Miniature,” features an architectural model gallery lined with original tiny works by artists including Rachel Whiteread, Maggi Hambling, Grayson Perry, John Akomfrah, Tacita Dean, and Lubaina Himid.
    The works span all media, from Damien Hirst’s half-inch spin painting to Edmund de Waal’s tiny ceramic sculpture atop a petite pedestal. Even Akomfrah’s stirring film installations have been compressed into a photographic triptych that fits inside one lilliputian gallery. Another prize is the inclusion of a miniature print from the late photographer Khadija Saye’s series “Crown,” the only work not destroyed in the Grenfell Tower fire that also claimed the artist’s life.
    1934 Model Art Gallery. Photo: Barney Hindle © Pallant House Gallery.
    The dollhouse-sized space will be the third model gallery in the Pallant’s collection, following in the footsteps of the “Thirty Four Gallery” and “The Model Art Gallery 2000.” The first, created in 1934 at the request of art dealer Syndey Burney to raise money for charity, featured works by Vanessa Bell, Ivon Hitchens, and Henry Moore. To mark the new millennium, Pallant House Gallery commissioned “The Model Art Gallery 2000,” itself a replica of the gallery’s white cube extension, and showcasing artists from the collection of Colin St. John Wilson, including Frank Auerbach, Peter Blake, Antony Gormley, Anthony Caro, and Howard Hodgkin.
    Model Art Gallery 2020. Photo: Barney Hindle © Pallant House Gallery.
    The trio of model galleries comprise a micro time capsule of more than 80 years of British art, encompassing artists from the Bloomsbury Group, the Pop art era, and the Young British Artists of the 1990s.
    The collaborative project is “filled with optimism and hope for the future: about creating something positive out of all of this disruption and uncertainty,” said Pallant House Gallery director Simon Martin in a statement. “All the usual complex considerations about curation and display have come into play, about different media and forms of art including painting, drawing, sculpture, site-specific installation, and photography.”
    Martin adds that he plans for the exhibition to travel to other venues in the future.
    During the past year of lockdown, numerous other artists have turned to the small stage as well, including curator Filippo Lorenzin and artist Marianna Benetti, who created a miniature art gallery for their urbane pet gerbils, and a Brooklyn-based artist who launched a contest for creatives to share their dream homes rendered in miniature clay dioramas.
    See more images from the show below.
    Edmund de Waal, and show and end (2020). Pallant House Gallery, Chichester. (Donated by the Artist, 2020) © Edmund de Waal.
    Gary Hume, Archipelago (2020). Pallant House Gallery, Chichester. (Donated by the Artist, 2020) © Gary Hume.
    Bob and Roberta Smith, Look (2020). Pallant House Gallery, Chichester. (Donated by the Artist, 2020) © Bob and Roberta Smith.
    Maggi Hambling, Naked Night (2020). Pallant House Gallery, Chichester. (Donated by the Artist, 2020) ©Maggi Hambling.

    Follow Artnet News on Facebook: Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward. More

  • in

    Painter Amy Sherald’s New Show in Los Angeles Encourages Patient Looking and Quiet Contemplation—See Images Here

    In these turbulent times, creativity and empathy are more necessary than ever to bridge divides and find solutions. Artnet News’s Art and Empathy Project is an ongoing investigation into how the art world can help enhance emotional intelligence, drawing insights and inspiration from creatives, thought leaders, and great works of art.

    “Amy Sherald: The Great American Fact”at Hauser & Wirth, Los Angelesthrough June 6

    What the gallery says: “Amy Sherald is acclaimed for paintings of Black Americans at leisure that achieve the authority of landmarks in the grand tradition of social portraiture—a tradition that for too long excluded the Black men, women, and families whose lives have been inextricable from the narrative of the American experience.
    Subverting the genre of portraiture and challenging accepted notions of American identity, Sherald attempts to restore a broader, fuller picture of humanity. She positions her subjects as ‘symbolic tools that shift perceptions of who we are as Americans, while transforming the walls of museum galleries and the canon of art history—American art history, to be more specific.’”
    Why it’s worth a look: Sherald, who spent the past year making the five pictures in this show, is famously a slow-moving, intensely focused artist. Her reduced production allows her to carefully articulate the sorts of details that characterize her precise paintings: the soft smear of pink on the dog’s nose in A Midsummer Afternoon Dream (2020), the broken fencing along the dunes in An Ocean Away (2020). Her careful painterly fluency encourages appropriately patient, measured looking that is rare in the 21st century.
    How it can be used as an empathy workout: The show draws its title from educator Anna Julia Cooper’s 1892 book The Great American Fact, in which she argues that Black Americans are “the one objective reality on which scholars sharpened their wits, and at which orators and statesmen fired their eloquence.” In Sherald’s works, the objective reality of “public Blackness,” as the show’s press release puts it, comes through in portraits of everyday people, living quiet yet proud lives. Perhaps more than anything, these figures invite an empathetic viewer, someone willing to approach the painting with kindness and humility.
    “Her paintings,” as the gallery says, “celebrate the Black body at leisure, thereby revealing her subjects’ whole humanity. Sherald’s work thus foregrounds the idea that Black life and identity are not solely tethered to grappling publicly with social issues, and that resistance lies equally in a full interior life and an expansive vision of selfhood in the world.”
    What it looks like:
    Amy Sherald, A Midsummer Afternoon Dream (detail, 2020). © Amy Sherald. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Joseph Hyde.
    Amy Sherald, A Midsummer Afternoon Dream (detail, 2020). © Amy Sherald. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Joseph Hyde.
    Amy Sherald, A bucket full of treasures (Papa gave me sunshine to put in my pockets…) (2020). © Amy Sherald. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Joseph Hyde.
    Amy Sherald, An Ocean Away (2020). © Amy Sherald. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Joseph Hyde.
    Amy Sherald, Hope is the thing with feathers (The little bird) (detail, 2020). © Amy Sherald. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Joseph Hyde.
    Amy Sherald, As American as Apple Pie (2020). © Amy Sherald. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Joseph Hyde.
    Follow Artnet News on Facebook: Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward. More