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    “HOGAR” by BOAMISTURA in Getafe, Spain

    The artistic collective Boa Mistura inaugurates two murals in the new Livensa Living student residence located on the Carlos III University Campus in Getafe. On the more than 107 square meters of interior and exterior walls, the people of Madrid have left their unique artistic mark, starting with colorful and harmonious typefaces to condense messages that embrace and communicates with the viewer.HOGAR y UNIÓN are the foundations and essence of Livensa Living and now, also, the words that are highlighted in the new artistic work of Boa Mistura. Acting as immense canvases, they encapsulate the essence of a generation, of a life stage and of a transforming space. The murals represent the essence of everything that happens in a residence: a meeting point and refuge. Hogar y Union: “important roots building stories and memories for life”, as the artists point out.Starting from the superimposition of the characters of the words and playing with geometry and color, Boa Mistura wanted to express the idea of ​​understanding the residence as an anchor that defines and builds us, leaving an indelible trail in each of the tenants.The artistic action, curated, managed and supervised by Rebobinart, has been carried out from April 18 to May 6 and will be inaugurated at the beginning of the next academic year, in September 2022. Added to this intervention is the one already completed in the residence of students Livensa Living Granada Fuentenueva with the work of Marina Capdevila and the next intervention of Uriginal in the new project Livensa Living Studios Madrid Alcobendas.Check out below for more photos of the mural. More

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    “G O A L – Struttura G070” by Giulio Vesprini in Castellano, Italy

    “The park is famous for its astronomical observatory and my work pays homage to this fantastic place with its surrounding landscape by observing the moon, the sea, the beautiful countryside and the Via Lactea…” Giulio Vesprini stated.Giulio Vesprini is an artist and graphic designer who works in a variety of media. He has attended two major schools: Accademy of Fine Arts in Macerata and the Departement of Architecture in Ascoli Piceno. With a subtle minimalistic approach, Vesprini focuses on the idea of ‘public space’ and more specifically on spaces where graphic and wall can be united at any given moment: the non-private space and space that is economically uninteresting can become utility space. His artworks are often about contact with architecture and graphic elements.By applying abstraction, he creates intense personal moments masterfully created by means of rules and omissions, acceptance and refusal, luring the viewer round and round in circles. His practice provides some graphic tools with a minimalist approach in the world of art: these meticulously planned works resound and resonate with images culled from the fantastical realm of imagination. More

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    “The Sanctuary” by Swoon in North Braddock, Pennsylvania

    Artist Caledonia Curry, also known as Swoon—one of the most famous artist activists today is currently working on a project called “The Sanctuary” in North Braddock, Pennsylvania.Artist’s rendering of The Sanctuary WindowsSwoon grew up with drug addicted parents who went through the U.S. incarceration system. This left a major impact on her and her practice, leading her to start the nonprofit The Heliotrope Foundation to help communities in crisis through artist collaborations. And in 2007, Swoon and a group of friends were invited to purchase and restore one of Braddock, PA’s landmark buildings: an abandoned church. They saved this structure from a tide of demolitions that were ravaging the area, alongside economic blight and lack of job and educational opportunities, and turned it into a creative space with community tile-making workshops.Architectural renderings by Lauris SvarupsNow, Swoon is working with Za’kiyah House to transform the Braddock, PA church into an art-filled community center and transitional living space for the homeless and people with addiction issues and criminal records. “The Sanctuary” will become apartments, a social hall and a sanctuary space.The Sanctuary will become apartments, a social hall and a sanctuary space serving the community of North Braddock, PA. It will address the housing discrimination faced by people with criminal records and strengthen family bonds by providing apartments where families can stay together, rather than risk having children lost to the foster care system.Decoratively boarded up windows, awaiting replacement.While this work is local to one place, with its trauma informed model and restorative-justice based philosophy, The Sanctuary is creating a beacon that many other communities can steer by as we ask ourselves how we reckon with our notions of justice, and how we will learn to heal the intergenerational cycles of trauma that so often lead to devastating outcomes such as homelessness and incarceration.After successfully fundraising and constructing a new roof the team is now raising funds to replace the windows.  There are 38 custom windows that need replacing as well as a large stain-glass window designed by Swoon.Swoon launched a Kickstarter campaign (ending May 30) to raise funds for the space. Rewards for Kickstarter backers include pieces by fellow artists Shepard Fairey, Scott Erickson, Michael Reeder, Strange Dirt, Nelson Makamo, Ebony Patterson, Rajni Perera, Jean Jullien, Cara To, Komikka Patton, Shehzil Malik and Swoon.Original stain-glass window with new restoration design by Swoon“The opportunity to contribute to this work means so much to me. Both of my parents went through incarceration and rehab as a result of drug addictions, and the presence of houses like this meant that they could come back into my life in much stronger ways.  I’ve seen what happens when someone has a chance to rebuild their life, and how their second chance impacts everyone around them. I see this work as a step toward healing the cycles of intergenerational trauma that fuel so many of our societal crises.”“Also tremendously important is the chance to re-enfranchise the black community with land and property ownership. In 2020 I made the decision to donate a home that I owned to become Donnelle’s Safe Haven. There were many factors influencing this decision, and one of them was discovering the role that my own ancestors played in the enslavement of African people, and the recognition of the impacts that this history still has on the present day. As we work to address systemic racism in all of its manifestations, creating stability and empowerment through long term resources held within the black community is key. It’s my hope that some of the tens of millions of Americans with ancestors who benefited from our country’s brutal history will consider participating in projects like The Sanctuary as part of a larger movement toward reparations ” Swoon stated.This collaborative endeavor is the result of over a decade of community based arts and justice work. It is built on many many relationships and made possible by hundreds of people who have donated resources or lent a hand because they believe in Ronna Davis Moore’s vision, and want to support a new way forward. Please join in this big barn raising for healing-justice and creativity. To know more about the project, visit The Sanctuary’s page. More

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    “So Far, So Close” Charity Auction for Ukraine by PEJAC

    On the 23rd of February Pejac released his latest print: So Far, So Close, dealing with the indiscriminate and senseless loss that comes with war, not knowing that the very next day Russian forces would invade Ukraine. It is a striking image that depicts an infinite circular trench embedded in a desolate landscape, as soldiers burst over the top into battle. This artwork challenges the simplistic duality with which the war is too often described, as the artist himself puts it “sometimes perceiving someone as a friend or a foe is just a matter of perspective”.Trying to offer some help in this painful situation, the artist is offering a totally unique print proof of So Far, So Close at a charity auction. All 100% of the proceeds will be given to the NGOs Voices of Children, focused on helping children who have suffered as a result of military operations to recover psychologically and psychosocially, and Acted, a French NGO that works to provide basic necessities to the population as well as helping in evacuation and crisis management training.The print itself measures 110 x 80 cm, and is the result of a painstaking multiphase production process that adds a novel feature to Pejac’s printmaking practice: the use of the monotype technique. To this one of one print proof, with the edition number #10/15, the artist has also hand-drawn in the finishing details of two plumes of blue and yellow coloured smoke, as well as different shades of acrylic and coloured pencils to different areas of the print.The auction will start on the 12th of May at 16:00 hrs (CET) and will run until the 26th of May at 16:00 hrs (CET). It will be held by the Tate Ward auction house together with the online art platform Artsy. To take part online you can use the following link. Potential buyers will need to register for an account with Artsy on their website.So Far, So Close – Artist’s Proof Print110 x 80 cm (43.3 x 31.5 inch)Single-coloured hand-pulled photopolymer on hand-coloured monotypeOkawara paper on Velin d’Arches cotton paper 300 gsmHand-finished by the artist by use of acrylic paint and pencilSigned and numbered by the artistA certificate of authenticity will be issued six months after the purchasePacked and delivered in a custom-made wooden crate featuring a laser-engraved image of one scene of the artworkSo Far, So Close – Postcard Lottery Ticket21 x 14.8 cm (8.27 x 5.83 inch)High-quality digital print in colourFinesse Premium Silk 350 gsm paper mounted on 2.25 mm grey cardboardHand-finished by the artist by use of acrylic paintSigned by the artistThe artist invites anyone who’d like to spread awareness of the fundraising to do so through his Instagram profile @Pejac_art. To say thank you for the help and support there will be a giveaway of 5 hand-painted, signed postcards from the SFSC collection.To participate, you’ll need to:-Follow the account @Pejac_art-Mention in the post those who you think might want to help, using the hashtag #pejac_ukraine-Finally, if you would like to, though it’s not mandatory, share a post or story including the artwork, with the hashtag #pejac_ukraineThe five recipients will be selected and announced on the 27th of May, the day after the auction.You can follow this link for all the terms and conditions. More

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    “RECONNECT” Nuart Aberdeen Festival 2022

    As we emerge blinking from the uncertainty and radical disconnection of the past two years of lockdown and social distancing, it is disorienting to rediscover those social connections and relationships to the people, places and spaces of our cities that have been stretched to the limit and in many cases broken and lost. No longer objects of risk, fear and constant surveillance, we hope Nuart’s “reconnect” edition can help to dial down the background anxiety that had become part of our daily lives.  To help us do this, we have connected with artists, academics and industry professionals from across the globe to explore and present the very best that this culture has to offer.Mural by Elisa-CapdevilaNUART ARTISTS This year’s festival plays host to 11 inspiring national and international street artists. Festival artist Martin Whatson reconnects with a new piece having lost his earlier work to developers, whilst Scottish stencil artist James Klinge makes his debut and Spanish artist and activist Jofre Oliveras’ murals promise new connections with the city’s spaces. We also have a rare festival appearance from Spanish artist Pejac, whose trompe-l’œil techniques have enchanted audiences around the world. Portuguese artist Nuno Viegas will bring his clean and minimal work that draws on traditional graffiti for inspiration, while Barcelona-based Slim Safont’s striking murals offer intriguing links to our daily lives.Mural by PEJACPopular Copenhagen-based muralist JACOBA returns to Aberdeen with an aim to creatively disrupt our sense of disconnection and indifference, and we are pleased to welcome London-based artist and activist for trans rights Erin Holly, whose studio and street-based practice are making an international impact. Spanish artist Elisa Capdevila’s large scale murals promise evocative slices of life reconnected, while Moroccan artist Mohamed L’Ghacham will recreate resonant scenes from everyday life writ large. Joining us from Norway, artist Miss.Printed will delight and surprise audiences with her delicate miniature paper collages placed in the streets. On Sunday 12th, the artist will also be running a Street Collage workshop open to the public, alongside Nuart Aberdeen’s Chalk Don’t Chalk workshops which encourage children and families to create their own chalk street art pieces.Mural by Nuno ViegasTo launch the festival on Thursday June 9th, internationally renowned photographer and subcultural legend Martha Cooper joins us direct from The Congo for a special screening of Martha: A Picture Story, followed by an audience Q+A at the Belmont Cinema, and on Friday June 10th, join festival artists and guests in a chaotic – but possibly educational – street art ‘Fight Club’ hosted by Doug Gillen of Fifth Wall TV at Spin, Aberdeen.NUART PLUS The extended Nuart Plus programme includes artist talks, panel debates, film screenings, walking tours and workshops. The theme for this year’s street art conference (10-11 June) at Cowdray Hall follows the festival theme, Reconnect. The two-day program brings artists, researchers, creative practitioners and the public together for the first time since 2019. Highlights include artist talks from festival artists, and panels with local, national and international creative practitioners.Keynote speaker Dr Lucy Finchett-Maddock (UK) unpicks the powerful relationship between art, transgression and power while Dr Stephen Pritchard (UK) will share his thoughts on the recent community turn in street art. Melbourne-based researcher and curator Dr Lachlan MacDowall (AU) will share his experience curating Flash Forward, a city-wide program combining art and music, while Dr Erik Hannerz (SE) will share his ideas on how we could “re-write” the city, and think outside the grid, by adopting some lessons learned from those who see the city’s surfaces as full of creative possibilities. The program also includes panel discussions for creative professionals on strategies for creating and sustaining independent creative spaces and projects.Mural by Slim SafontIssue 6 of Nuart Journal will be exclusively launched at the Nuart Aberdeen’s Street Art Conference, on Saturday 11th of June. Nuart Journal was first published in 2018 to widespread critical acclaim. Professor Jeff Ferrell, from Texas Christian University has called Nuart Journal “the most exciting mix of political, visual, and intellectual energy I’ve seen in a long time!”Working in collaboration with Aberdeen Inspired and Aberdeen City Council, the multi-award winning Nuart Aberdeen will once again transform the streetscape of the Granite City.Mural by Martin WhatsonInstallation by Martha CooperMural by Mohamed L’GhachamMural by Erin HollyMural by James KlingeMural by Jacoba NiepoortInstallation by Miss PrintedMural by Jofre Oliveras More

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    How to Look at a Basquiat

    It’s not everyday that New York has two Basquiat exhibitions. At “Art and Objecthood,” decoding the basics: his materials, iconography and unmistakable line.It’s not everyday that New Yorkers can choose between two concurrent exhibitions of work by Jean-Michel Basquiat. “King Pleasure,” an immersive experience designed by the architect David Adjaye and curated by the artist’s sisters Lisane Basquiat and Jeanine Heriveaux, includes a recreation of Jean-Michel’s childhood bedroom and his studio and charges $35 admission. “Art and Objecthood,” curated by the art historian Dieter Buchhart at Nahmad Contemporary, gathers an extraordinary trove of paintings Basquiat made on doors, windows and a refrigerator.Though “King Pleasure” includes a number of never-before-seen pieces, too, its emphasis is distinctly on the artist’s life, so I’ve focused on the Nahmad show, whose sparse staging give you a better chance of engaging with the work itself. But you should keep his biographical basics in mind.Young and ambitious, Basquiat shot straight into the center of the New York art world when he was barely out of his teens, showing with some of the country’s most influential gallerists, haunting nightclubs with Andy Warhol, and producing a staggering quantity of art work before dying of a heroin overdose, at the age of 27, in 1988. In 2017, one of his paintings sold for more than $110 million, the highest price ever paid at auction for a work by an American artist.He was also the Brooklyn-born son of a Haitian father and Boricua mother, and though his family wasn’t poor, he spent a few lean years on his own before he started selling work. When he did hit the artistic big time, he was one of the few Black faces there — and issues of race and class, complicated by his own extreme experience, are all over his work.Jean-Michel Basquiat’s “Untitled (Refrigerator),” (1981). In the artist’s hands, it wavers between appliance and found surface on which to draw.Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New YorkMaterialsLike most artists, Basquiat drew as a child, famously copying anatomical drawings from “Gray’s Anatomy” while recuperating from a car accident. His first real foray into the adult art world, though, was via the graffiti tag SAMO, which he and his high school friend Al Diaz posted up around SoHo and the School of Visual Arts. Before continuing on to canvas, Basquiat used “found materials” like discarded cardboard and paper or construction debris. In part this was born of necessity — canvas costs money, while broken windows were there for the taking in downtown Manhattan in the 1970s.But Basquiat’s use of found materials was also, as the painted windows, doors and sections of wooden fencing in “Art and Objecthood” make clear, a daring artistic strategy that reverberated through even his more conventional efforts. Unlike ready-mades, the manufactured goods that Marcel Duchamp exhibited as art in the early years of the 20th century, Basquiat’s found objects aren’t exactly sculpture. They’re surfaces for him to paint on. But because they are, also, recognizable objects in their own right, they have a beguiling sort of ambiguity. You can’t quite see “Untitled (Refrigerator)” (1981) as only an appliance, or only a surface to draw on — the longer you look, the more it seems to waver between both categories. And once you’re primed for that sort of ambiguity, you start to see it everywhere. In another context, “Multiflavors” (1982), a royal-blue canvas on exposed wooden stretchers, might just look like a painting. Here, it’s a very peculiar object, too.Jean-Michel Basquiat, “Minor Success” (1980). Pared-down graffiti techniques and pointed assertions of dignity and individuality.Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New YorkIconographyBasquiat didn’t spend long writing graffiti, but he used its techniques throughout his career. The graffiti writer’s pared-down repertoire of easy-to-recognize signs can be as effective on a gallery wall as they are on the side of a building, and one of his favorites — a simple, icon-like crown — shows up on the first piece in “Art and Objecthood,” a white wooden cabinet door titled “Minor Success” (1980). Beneath it are a face without features and a cartoonish sports car.“If you ask 10 people” about the crown, says Buchhart, the curator, “they’ll tell you 10 different meanings.” He goes on to cite Basquiat’s often-quoted remark that his artistic subjects — musicians, athletes, artists — were “royalty, heroism and the streets,” and the way the crown serves to emphasize images or works particularly special to the artist.Essentially, though, the crown claims a figurative mantle of royalty for the artist himself, for the figure he’s depicting, or both — Basquiat’s faces and bodies often read at least partially as self-portraits. But it’s also more nuanced than that, particularly as wielded by a young Black artist intent on making himself a celebrity. You have to ask what kind of social context required him to make such pointed assertions of dignity. Is it one in which Black faces struggle to be recognized as individuals? Or one in which status comes from the possession of material objects like a fancy car?Jean-Michel Basquiat, “Multiflavors” (1982). A painting on canvas demonstrates the unique quality of Basquiat’s writing.Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New YorkWriting/DrawingAnother aspect of graffiti that Basquiat kept hold of was the use of writing for visual effect. In many earlier collages and works on paper, a deluge of all-caps writing fills every available square inch. But you can’t read from beginning to end and expect to find an argument. What you get instead is a cloud of loose associations more similar to a picture, in the way you read it, than to ordinary prose or even poetry.This quality is amplified by the way Basquiat mixes drawing and writing together. If you look back at “Multiflavors,” you’ll find that it has a three-pointed yellow crown in the middle and a cloud of red and yellow circles to one side, and that the white, yellow and pink writing, arranged over blocks of black and blue, forms a striking composition. When you come to read it, you find a group of what appear to be references to advertisements or restaurant signs, phrases like “cheap food” and “HACKED CHICKEN WITH MULTIFLAVORS.” You can’t definitively say whether it’s satire or poetry, angry or exuberant or funny. But it could almost be all of them.CompositionOne thing in particular that’s easier to see in “Art and Objecthood” than in the overwhelming visual cacophony of “King Pleasure” is how conservatively Basquiat organized the elements of his paintings. The sheer profusion of marks can be misleading, but if you recognize the scratches and scrawls of “Minor Success,” for example, as providing a texture rather than so many pieces of separate information, you’ll see that the arrangement of crown, face and car couldn’t be more straightforward. A squat little refrigerator is adorned with a burst of letters and a face in “Untitled (Refrigerator),” but they stop just short of the handle, letting the mostly blank lower section balance their effect. And even when every mark really does carry the same weight, as in an intricately painted yellow door, Basquiat keeps careful control of shape and color to create an overall effect of harmony and stability that balances the frantic energy of his lines.Jean-Michel Basquiat, “Untitled” (1982). His line “shivers like someone naked in a snowstorm.”Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New YorkLineThe most stunning piece in “Art and Objecthood” may be an untitled painting from 1982 — the year the artist himself claimed to have “made the best paintings ever.” Done in acrylic and enamel on a packing blanket mounted on exposed wooden stretchers, it shows a Black face with white features and a blood-red skull marked with little black dashes like watermelon seeds.It’s a searing portrait of the psychic toll of racism: Even as slurs and insulting tropes leave him bloody and exposed, the figure wears a “white” expression to get along. It’s another stately composition, too, balancing a dense figure on one side with empty space on the other and underlining both for emphasis. And it’s as good a place as any to study what may be the single most distinctive feature of Basquiat’s work — his line.The line that describes this skull shivers like someone naked in a snowstorm. It makes a break in the jaw, uneven eyebrows, a bump on the crown of the skull. It doesn’t leave anything unclear; the drawing is as easy to read as a geometric diagram. But this shakiness does transmit extra information. It lends the figure a particular kind of intensity, making the eyes squint and the teeth gnash, and it gives a similar intensity to the art work as a whole, evoking the tension and energy that must have gone into making it. At the same time, it gives you a sense, more vivid than any mere biography, of the personality of the man who drew it — manic and melancholy, electric, incandescent.Jean-Michel Basquiat: Art and ObjecthoodThrough June 11, Nahmad Contemporary, 980 Madison Avenue, third floor, 646-449-9118; nahmadcontemporary.com.— More

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    “Invisible Sensations” Solo Show by Sun Woo at Carl Kostyál Gallery, London

    Korean artist Sun Woo will be opening her debut solo show in London at Carl Kostyál, 12a Savile Row on Thursday May 12th (Private view 6-8 pm). The exhibition will run until June 11th 2022.In Invisible Sensations, Sun Woo directs her attention to these unseen constraints and frailties encountered by both our bodies and social bodies, clouded by the reflective surface of technology. Informed by her early and recent medical conditions and the forms of limitations encountered within society, the works in this show present disembodied figures that are obscured, altered, or confined, attesting to their history of struggle or striving to break free. These fragmented parts fill the canvases and corners of the room, responding to their surrounding world and addressing their intimate desires. Cropped-out images of her own bones, hair, and flesh from photographs and scanning devices become visual resources that are digitally reconfigured and merged with images and 3D models found online. Removed from their original context to be reassembled into augmented narratives, these fractured bodies strive to look into their own fragility and endurance, raising questions about the extent to which their unification with technology can liberate or protect them, or transform the atmosphere and territory they inhabit. ​ Sun Woo (b. 1994) lives and works in Seoul, South Korea. She obtained her BA in Visual Art from Columbia University, New York in 2017. Her works have been exhibited in galleries and art spaces including Rundgænger by Schierke Seinecke, Frankfurt (2022); ATM Gallery, New York (2021); Art Sonje Center, Seoul (2021); Galerie Hussenot, Paris (2021); Fragment Gallery, Moscow (2021); WoawGallery, Hong Kong (2021); Cylinder, Seoul (2021); ‘Stockholm Sessions’ Carl Kostyál Hospitalet, Stockholm, (2020), Harlesden High Street, London (2020); Foundwill Art Society, Seoul (2020); P21, Seoul (2020); 2/W Weekend, Seoul (2018); among others. ‘Invisible Sensations’ is her debut show with Carl Kostyál.  ​ More

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    “Beyond Walls” by Saype in Venice, Italy

    Artist and innovator Saype presents his new creation, making Venice part of his Beyond Walls global human chain. The work, which is sailing through the Serenissima on the occasion of the Biennale Art, has been unveiled on April 21.Giant biodegradable landart painting by French-Swiss artist Saype from the Beyond Walls project on Friday April 15, 2022 on a floating barge in Venice, Italy. Extending over an area of 8 by 30 meters this fresco was created using biodegradable pigments made out of charcoal, chalk, water and milk proteins. The piece will travel in and around Venice and will be unveiled during the Biennale Arte 2022 59th International Art Exhibition. (Valentin Flauraud for Saype)An exhibition dedicated to Beyond Walls is held at Torre di Porta Nuova dell’Arsenale Nord. To open the exhibition, Karole Vail, Director of the Peggy Guggenheim Museum, and Francesca Lavazza, Board member of the Lavazza Group, will join Saype for a meeting entitled “Art and Sustainability”, a paradigm that perfectly sums up the ephemeral and striking nature of the artist’s work.  “Beyond Walls” is a monumental project launched by Saype based on a premise: the world is polarized, a part of the population has chosen to withdraw into itself. However, Saype underlines it:“I am deeply convinced that it is together that humanity will be able to respond to the different challenges it will have to overcome“.It is from this conviction that the desire was born to share a positive message of mutual aid and common effort throughout the world by symbolically creating the largest human chain ever made in the world.The project started in 2019 from Paris, at the foot of the Eiffel Tower, and travels the world from city to city with the ambition to cross the 5 continents and connect people from all over the world.Saype creates monumental frescoes on grass, earth, sand and snow. Inventor of an eco-responsible painting, he is recognized as the pioneer of an artistic movement that jointly honors street art and landart. His innovative approach and technique earned him a 2019 Forbes Magazine nomination as one of the thirty most influential people under thirty in art and culture. New York, Paris, Geneva, Cape Town, Turin, Dubaï, Nairobi, Istanbul, Ouagadougou, Miami, (…) his poetic and ephemeral works travel around the world to impact mentalities in respect of nature.Take a look below for more photos of the project. More