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    How to Remove Graffiti

    AdvertisementContinue reading the main storySupported byContinue reading the main storyTip How to Remove GraffitiHumans have been marking up walls for millenniums. Carry the paint colors you’re most likely to need, but never get attached to a clean, monochromatic surface.Credit…RadioFeb. 23, 2021, 5:00 a.m. ET“Graffiti is not going away ever,” says Thomas Corrales, 53, who works for the Los Angeles Department of Public Works training and overseeing crews of graffiti cleaners. Some 175 cleaners fan out across the city every day; in the second half of last year, they removed 3.5 million square feet of graffiti. Corrales grew up in a neighborhood where spray-painted tags were so pervasive that he became almost blind to them. Then one day in 1993, the unemployment office got him a graffiti-abatement job. Now he can’t help spotting even the tiniest Sharpie tags.Unauthorized paint on a wall can be many things — art, hate speech, social and political messaging, vandalism, the claiming of space. However it manifests, it often has a multiplier effect: Graffiti begets more graffiti, and tags will be tagged over. On occasion, when Corrales paints over graffiti, someone shows up to tag it anew before he can even drive away. Remember that humans have been marking up walls for millenniums; don’t get angry or take it personally. “We’re trained not to confront anyone,” Corrales says. If you ever feel unsafe, leave and come back later. Wear long pants and boots, preferably the steel-toed kind if you plan to use a water blaster (water sprayed at 3,500 pounds per square inch can take off skin). As you traverse streets, carry the paint colors you’re most likely to need, including gray, beige, tan and white. If you don’t have the exact color, use a spectrophotometer to measure hue and make a match. For walls, paint with either a roller or a paint sprayer. For stop signs, murals and most metal surfaces, use a water-based chemical remover mostly known by its brand name, Krud Kutter. City-approved murals are sealed with a clear coat that makes them easier to wipe clean. For the multistory spatterings that people make by filling fire hoses with paint and shooting it out with a fire extinguisher, you’ll want cherry-picker trucks. Clean sidewalks with a high-pressure water and sand blaster.Cityscapes are covered in layer after layer of paint, like an ever thickening skin. Never get attached to a clean, monochromatic surface. “You know that it’s going to be retagged,” Corrales says. “And you’re going to come back again, too.”AdvertisementContinue reading the main story More

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    A Technicolor Flower Bed Sprouts From a 70-Foot-Tall Water Tower in Arkansas

    
    Art

    #flowers
    #murals
    #public art
    #site-specific

    January 13, 2021
    Grace Ebert

    All images © Justkids, shared with permission
    A drab water tower in Fort Chaffee, Arkansas, is overrun with a 70-foot-tall garden of technicolor flowers and vines thanks to artists Darren and Emmelene Mate, aka DabsMyla. The Australian wife and husband are known for their hand-painted psychedelic dreamscapes, which envelop the otherwise utilitarian tank with oversized flora. Titled “Magical Unity,” the circular mural features plants native to the region, along with a fuzzy bumblebee mid-pollination, all rendered in the duo’s playful style.
    DabsMyla completed the public project in just one week, which they describe:

    Color plays a big role in our work and how we create. For this piece, we wanted to produce an uplifting feeling through flowers and running a rainbow of hues from the bottom to the top. This is a really large work, and we hope that it will positively impact the community and bring happiness to everyone who passes by it.

    The transformative artwork is the latest commissioned by the women-led curators of Justkids (previously) and OZ Art, which have been collaborating to revitalize areas around Arkansas in recent years. Shop pins and stickers of DabsMyla’s quirky characters in their shop, and check out more of the couple’s work on Instagram.

    #flowers
    #murals
    #public art
    #site-specific

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    Photorealistic Figures Embody Childhood Wonder in Dreamy Murals by Lula Goce

    
    Art

    #childhood
    #murals
    #photorealism
    #public art
    #street art

    January 11, 2021
    Grace Ebert

    Bronx, New York City. All images © Lula Goce, shared with permission
    From New York City to Azerbaijan to Kristianstad, Sweden, artist Lula Goce transforms blank walls into ethereal artworks that illustrate childlike wonder and growth. Her murals merge photorealistic renderings of adolescent subjects with otherworldly surroundings: plumes of flowers and vines wind around the figures, serpentine creatures emerge from the plants, and shrunken landscapes rest in the children’s hands. Serene and dreamy, the works often center on children painted in subtle tones who peer into the distance or are deep in sleep.
    Based in Vigo, Spain, Goce sells prints of her large- and small-scale works in her shop, and you can follow where she’s headed next on Instagram.

    Kristianstad, Sweden
    Belorado, Spain
    Murcia, Spain
    Vigo, Spain
    Västervik, Sweden
    Vilanova i la Geltrú, Spain
    Panxon, Nigrán, Spain

    #childhood
    #murals
    #photorealism
    #public art
    #street art

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    First Inventory of Damage to U.S. Capitol Building Released

    #masthead-section-label, #masthead-bar-one { display: none }The Presidential TransitionliveLatest UpdatesCalls for Impeachment25th Amendment ExplainedTrump Officials ResignHow Mob Stormed CapitolAdvertisementContinue reading the main storySupported byContinue reading the main storyFirst Inventory of Damage to U.S. Capitol Building ReleasedThe damage was largely limited to broken glass, busted doors and graffiti, the report said.Capitol Police surveyed the damage to an entrance to the U.S. Capitol building on Thursday, a day after a mob of Trump supporters broke in and vandalized the building.Credit…Jason Andrew for The New York TimesJan. 8, 2021, 6:07 p.m. ETThe office of the Architect of the Capitol in Washington, the office that preserves and maintains the building’s art and architecture, released Friday the first inventory of the damage sustained during Wednesday’s riot.Damage to the interior of the building was largely limited to broken glass, busted doors and graffiti, the report said, though it noted that statues, murals and historic benches displayed the residue of various pepper sprays, tear gas and fire extinguishers deployed by both rioters and law enforcement personnel. They will need to be carefully cleaned and conserved, the report said.Outside the building, two bronze light fixtures designed in the late 19th century by Frederick Law Olmsted, the American landscape architect, and that illuminate the grounds at night, were broken. The report also noted graffiti on the west side of the building near stands which are being constructed for the inauguration of Joseph R. Biden Jr. later this month.The Rotunda doors of the U.S. Capitol building sustained damage after rioters broke in on Wednesday. Credit…Jonathan Ernst/ReutersRioters who stormed the U.S. Capitol building on Wednesday afteroon overturned tables and smashed windows, but left the singular artwork intact.Credit…Andrew Harnik/Associated PressNo major artworks were reported damaged, despite the violent demonstrations inside the building by Trump supporters that took the Capitol Police nearly four hours to quell. A mob broke into rooms on the south side of the Capitol (including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office), smashed windows and then marched through the National Statuary Hall, waving American, Confederate and “Trump Is My President” flags.Vandals in red “Make America Great Again” hats, many of whom photographed and recorded themselves, wreaked havoc in Congressional offices and the Rotunda. One man crammed a framed photo of the Dalai Lama into his backpack, while another smoked marijuana in a room with maps of Oregon on the wall. A 19th-century marble bust of former President Zachary Taylor was defaced with a red substance that looked like blood.Workers cleaned up broken glass and debris inside the U.S. Capitol building on Thursday.Credit…Brendan Smialowski/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesBut the large-scale, 18-foot paintings by Trumbull and other artists that depict scenes from the republic’s founding in the Rotunda, and the dozens of statues that fill the National Statuary Hall to the south that filled the background of many of the rioters’ photos, all appear to have escaped damage.The office noted on Thursday that many of its employees had worked through the night to clean up the trash, glass and other debris that littered the building and begin repair work.“Wednesday was a difficult day for our campus,” the architect of the Capitol, J. Brett Blanton, said in a statement. “As the Architect of the Capitol mission calls us to serve, preserve and inspire, it was particularly hard to watch the scene unfold.”AdvertisementContinue reading the main story More

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    Celebrating the Late Tamara Djurovic, AKA Hyuro, and Her Sincere, Monumental Murals

    
    Art

    #murals
    #public art
    #street art

    November 20, 2020
    Grace Ebert

    Argentinian artist Tamara Djurovic, who worked under the name Hyuro, died Thursday at her home in Valencia. Known for imbuing her works with sincerity, the artist utilized her large-scale pieces to capture the complexity of human emotion. Her style was distinct and subdued, and her process was informed by her concerns and questions about the world, a process she spoke of at length previously on Colossal.
    During her life, Djurovic made significant strides in the international mural community that is largely male-dominated. She completed projects across Europe, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, the United States, Morocco, and Tunisia, many of which you can see on her site and Instagram.

    #murals
    #public art
    #street art

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    An Anamorphic Mural Transforms a Montreal Street into Undulating Sand Dunes

    
    Art

    #anamorphosis
    #murals
    #optical illusion
    #public art
    #sand
    #street art

    November 3, 2020
    Grace Ebert

    All images © NÓS, by Olivier Bousquet, Eloa Defly, Raphaël Thibodeau, Alex Lesage, and Charles Laurence Proulx
    Along the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, sandy drifts swell and surge in a massive mural by the Canadian architecture firm NÓS. Aptly named “Moving Dunes,” the anamorphic artwork is comprised of neutral-toned lines that undulate along the walkway, creating a deceptive path mimicking deserts and beaches. Chrome spheres sporadically appear along the street in order to reflect the surrounding architecture and rippling patterns on the ground.
    The 2018 project coincided with the museum’s exhibition, From Africa to the Americas: Face-to-face Picasso, Past and Present, which prompted NÓS to evoke the perspective-bending approach of cubist painters. “Moving Dunes” was chosen after an annual call for proposals to install a large-scale artwork on the Avenue de Musée. Follow NÓS’s latest designs and illusory projects on Instagram. (via designboom)

    #anamorphosis
    #murals
    #optical illusion
    #public art
    #sand
    #street art

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    A Colorful Geometric Mural of a Cityscape Visualizes Humans’ Impact on Nature

    
    Art

    #cityscapes
    #climate change
    #flowers
    #murals
    #nature
    #public art
    #street art

    November 2, 2020
    Grace Ebert

    “Love of Nature” in Chelyabinsk, Russia. All images © Vitaly Tsarenkov, shared with permission
    Artist Vitaly Tsarenkov, who works under the moniker SY, depicts the threat of ecological catastrophe through a new mural featuring geometric flora, fauna, and objects typically found in bustling city centers. Created for the Urban Morphogenesis festival in Chelyabinsk, Russia, “Love of Nature” is a vertical rendering of the human impact on nature, with color-blocked trucks, road cones, and towering buildings near the top and a fire, flowers, and tufts of grass occupying space at the bottom.
    Based in Saint Petersburg, Russia, Tsarenkov says the 50-meter-high mural conveys that each person has the agency to protect the planet’s resources. “It’s impossible to stop all harmful factories at once, but to make the first step towards the clean Earth is not difficult and within everybody’s power just by taking the trash away after recreation in nature,” he writes on Instagram.

    #cityscapes
    #climate change
    #flowers
    #murals
    #nature
    #public art
    #street art

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    Multi-Story Murals Showcase Domesticity through Elegant Ceramic Tableware

    
    Art

    #ceramics
    #murals
    #pottery
    #public art
    #street art
    #tableware

    October 23, 2020
    Grace Ebert

    Oviedo, Spain. All images © Manolo Mesa, shared with permission
    Spanish street artist Manolo Mesa merges public and private spheres through large-scale murals that highlight simple domestic objects. The multiple-story artworks depict traditional dining scenes, from an elegant porcelain tea set to a lone jug with swirling flourishes to another vessel resting on a saucer.
    To complete a recent tableau in Oviedo, Spain, for Parees Fest, Mesa explored the history of an abandoned pottery factory in San Claudio. Event organizers gathered tableware from local residents, a collection that informed the shapes and exterior motifs of his work. “I was able to see all the evolution of this earthenware in the houses of Oviedo. I found postwar pieces, which were inherited and preserved with great affection by collectors. We saw (the) tableware of a lifetime from the middle of the century,” he writes on Instagram. Showcasing a delicate collection of vessels, the resulting mural explores an otherwise hidden facet of local history.
    Find Mesa on Instagram to view some works-in-progress and follow his ceramic-centric projects.

    #ceramics
    #murals
    #pottery
    #public art
    #street art
    #tableware

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