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    Borondo Painted Over One Of His Murals in Turin, Italy

    A mural by Spanish artist Gonzalo Borondo was whitewashed by the will of the same author. It was covered with white spray paint, sprayed by a man who entered the Colosseum theater in Turin, where the piece is exhibited. The mural was removed from the place where it was made originally without the author’s permission, and displayed in the exhibition.Years ago some restorers were engaged in ripping out walls in abandoned places. They claimed to be non-profit, but Gonzalo and his team recently discovered that some works were for sale on platforms like Artsy.com. This stolen work of Borondo was found at a pay-to-entry exhibition in Turin, sharing space with many other stolen ones.The exhibition, Street Art on Blu 3, which a third of exhibited works of art are created by 36 of the most renowned street artists from around the world including the most recognizable, Banksy.Borondo and his team made a gesture to discourage the fact of profiting from the free interventions that surely we all have made/followed/supported spontaneously in abandoned places — they have whitewashed the work. For them, it was the right way to convey the message.“In fact, these interventions in public space weren’t made with the intention to create objects to consume, but to dialogue and accompany their surroundings. Without their context, the interventions make no sense, the will and the intent of the artist have disappeared, so, in the end, the artworks don’t exist anymore”, Borondo and his team expressed.Check below for photos of the said action.rpt More

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    “Amen” by Urka in Fermo, Italy

    Street artist Urka recently worked on a new mural entitled ” Amen” in Fermo for the event 360° of Fermo Urban Museum. His piece features devout individual carrying a golden vehicle with a cross. Check out below for photos of the mural.Urka is a talented, satirical scetch artist who enjoys also creating on city walls. Based in Italy, Urka is an introverted, meteoropathic and misanthropic person most of the time. His painting subjects usually revolves around silly and satiric puppets about human behaviors. More

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    “Sacral” by Edoardo Tresoldi in Ravenna, Italy

    From September 1, “Sacral”, an installation by Italian artist Edoardo Tresoldi will be open to the public at the Mar – Art Museum of the city of Ravenna. The work is the preview of the exhibition “An Epic POP” inside the exhibition project “Dante. The eyes and the mind”.With Sacral, built in 2016 and rehabilitated in the 2016th-century cloister of the city’s Museum of Art, the audience has the chance to physically enter the work, ideally in the Noble Castle, and retrace the Divine Comedy’s journey in a quasi-performative action.Within the path of the exhibition, the work has in fact a link with the Divina Commedia, poem written by the poet buried in the Italian city. In particular, the typical skeleton of Tresoldi’s installations refers, in the vision of the curator Giorgia Salerno, to the theme of souls and the Castle of the Great Spirits, described by Dante in the Canto IV of the Inferno, in which live the spirits of historical figures of the past, pagans and therefore not destinated to salvation.In a dialogue between classical architecture and contemporary art, the work transports the visitor into an unprecedented space-time experience in which arches, columns and domes create symphonies and contrasts with industrial materials. In fact, Sacral brings together some traits that characterize the artist’s work: the language of transparency capable of weaving in space something that is not there; references to Renaissance masters and classical architectural elements such as arches, columns and domes; the use of wire mesh to give shape to a new dimension in dialogue with light, atmospheric agents and the surrounding environment.Edoardo Tresoldi is an Italian artist, sculptor and set designer , known internationally for his monumental sculptures. explores the poetics of the dialogue between human beings and the landscape, using the language of architecture as an expressive tool and as a key to reading space.The artist plays with the transparency of wire mesh to transcend the spatiotemporal dimension and narrate a dialogue between art and the world, a visual synthesis revealed in the fading of the physical boundaries of his works.Scroll down below to view more photos of “Sacral” installation in Ravenna. More

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    “The Slash” by Motorefisico in Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy

    Street art duo Motorefisico just recently worked on their latest urban art intervention in the framework of the 8th edition of Antonio Giordano Urban Art Award (Premio Antonio Giordano) in Santa Croce di Magliano, Italy.The artwork, entitled “The Slash”, has been made on two facades of a private building, in the heart of downtown Santa Croce di Magliano. The inclination of the two facades made it possible to create two different optical effects that merge at the intersection with one of the windows, thus giving the composition a remarkable kinetic 3D effect. More

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    “CONVECTIVE MOTIONS” by Gola Hundun in Milan, Italy

    Italian artist Gola Hundun just recently finished his latest mural in Milan, Italy during  the INNESCHI Festival. The project is dedicated to the universal cyclic movement. The composition starts from a central element, identified as cosmic energy, a solar force that unravels centrifugally.Leaves are painted as if they were part of a fire explosion, following and growing the movement which consequently generates new ones, involving other celestial bodies, represented on the contiguous facades, symbolically returning towards the central sun in a perpetual cyclical movement. The three stars represent the three circles of the Celtic Triskele.The motion represented overcomes its two-dimensionality and becomes real, physical and tangible through the call of the avifauna, invited to take part in the universal movement through the installation of clay nests I realized with the citizens of Vimodrone according to the needs of the species of birds of the area indicated by LIPU Milano.The whole composition includes some endemic plants (useful for insects) and some grass, bushes, hornbeams, dogwoods, hazels, hawthorns and an English oak placed in axis with the tree painted on the wall. The tree of life represented is the same you can find into monotheistic or rather pagan religions. The two trees will be set in two movement: the painted one will be crystallized where as the real tree will grow up inexorably.The mural will be gradually hidden by the vegetation growing that will be set as a curtain – representing the time. The artwork can be put itself into the eternal cycle of life, hence it can not be defined as done, due to its vulnerability to the universal movement of existence.Gola Hundun’s work shows the relationship between human beings and the biosphere. This consideration combined with the conscious decision to live as a vegetarian since the age of 16, positions the artist and his work closer to both the animal and human spheres. He explores themes such as interspecies communication, shamanism, ecology, a return to the earth, vegetarianism, and spirituality.Check out below for more photos of “Convective Motions”. More

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    “…Back to school, Mickey Mouse!” by OZMO in Savona, Italy

    Urban artist OZMO just created a mural on the facade of the Istituto Comprensivo delle Albisole. The project was conceived by the Councilor for Culture and Education Simona Poggi and was created with the fundamental contribution of the A. De Mari.With this mural, Albisola confirms itself once again as a city that welcomes and develops languages from contemporary art. Over the years, in fact, the Ligurian town has been a privileged meeting place between tradition and avant-garde, a fundamental destination for great artists of the twentieth century.In “..Back to school, Mickey Mouse!”, The classical sculpture of a woman, absorbed in reading, is painted between two putti. On the one hand, that of the Verrocchio appears intent on reaching something and with his posture encourages us to look different perspectives; on the other, that of Canova, takes on the appearance of a Mickey Mouse with an unusual smile, causing wonder and estrangement.Born in Pontedera, Pisa, Ozmo made his first steps in the comics world, but since early 90s he soon moved his focus on writing and painting. In short time his tag would have become one of the most famous and respected ones in the Italian graffiti scene. A special reportage dedicated to Ozmo on ‘Aelle’ – the most famous urban culture underground mag in Italy – will consacrate him as one of the leading figure in the national underground writing scene.The way Ozmo is combining painterly elements like figures, shapes, colors and the way the composition is being constructed suggest how thorough is the artist’s approach. References from popular culture, art history, and politics that are wisely appropriated contribute largely to both seriousness and humor of his works, as well as to their contemporaneity.Check out below to see more photos of “…Back to school, Mickey Mouse!” More

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    “Botanica Resistente” by ETNIK in Rome, Italy

    Recently, the urban artist ETNIK, flanked by Mirko Pierri, curator of urban art for the a.DNA association, was finally able to start transforming the facade of the Liceo Scientifico Statale Francesco D’Assisi, between via Castore Durante e Viale Palmiro Togliatti, in Rome. The work, entitled “Botanica Resistente” was created in the days around April 25th, the “Liberation Day” in Italy, which commemorates the end of the Nazi’s occupation and the liberation from Fascism.The title refers to the original name of Viale Palmiro Togliatti which, until about 1979, was known as Viale della Botanica. A direct reference, therefore, to the toponymy that characterizes the whole district of Centocelle with its streets named after plants, trees, and flowers. Etnik’s work is undoubtedly based on the irremediable antithesis between architecture and nature: in the mural concrete blocks, asphalt and artificial works succumb to natural elements, giving life to a slow but gradual reconquest of spaces taken from nature. But “Botanica Resistente” has multiple readings.Those plants and flowers represented by the Italian urban artist, known and respected all over the world, also want to symbolize the ability to react of the inhabitants of Centocelle after the fires at La Pecora Elettrica, at the Baraka Bistrot, and other local shops in 2019. The symbolism used is a tribute to those who take action in their territories in defense of the common space for the dissemination of culture, inclusion, and social interaction. A feeling that is also the engine of the Uno, nessuno, Centocelle project. The light that is rekindled, the letters that thanks to the interaction come back to compose a collective story, culture as a tool.After five days of work in progress, the work is finished. Some hidden details are indirect references, such as the blank pages of suspended books. They are small dedications wanted by the artist, which can only be grasped by those who have lived in those places. “I wanted to symbolize a rebirth – explained Etnik – a breach in the concrete as a glimmer of possibilities to overcome this long dark period. The blank pages that I inserted in detail of the mural are still to be written – he concluded – a way to entice to leave negative events behind to move forward and write a better story.”The work is representative of familiar urban corners, on the border, where between asphalt and concrete, spontaneous plants are in a constant struggle for survival. “Living the streets to fight the social isolation and the speculative and criminal control of the neighborhood is necessary”, explained Mirko Pierri of a.DNA Project. “A similar work can and must support the inhabitants of the place that hosts it because telling about their actions enhances their constancy – he outlined – which is fundamental for the defense and survival of the identity of a territory”Check out below for more photos of “Botanica Resistente”. More

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    “Carbon Dioxide & Calathea Makoyana” by Fabio Petani in Gorle, Italy

    Italian street artist Fabio Petani just worked on his new project entitled “Carbon Dioxide & Calathea Makoyana” s part of the StreetArtBall Project. It was created to fuse street art and sport in support to the community’s urban regeneration.This initiative conveys the rebirth after the terrible period of the pandemic, which hit their area particularly hard, and on the other hand, attention to the environment.Fabio Petani’s works are characterized by a disarranged harmony of lines, shapes and volumes, which complement each other through the use of faint and harmonious colors, blended into breaking elements. His research analyzes the chemical and molecular aspects of objects giving rise to a lengthy operation of reconstruction of the elements in the periodic table. An increasingly detailed production that brings out an ever-changing organic complexity.Each chemical element, just like each plant, is somehow connected to the environment, the space or the context in which the wall is made. The importance of the connection between work and context is evoked also by his works on wood, paper and other alternative materials. It is through the employment of such materials that Fabio Petani tries to get carried away by the matter, aiming at ending the periodic table with a cluster of artworks able to tell a story about the alchemy between art, chemistry and nature.Check out below to see more photos of the project. More